Mother’s Day snowstorm could bring 2-4 inches of snow for Denver

Winter Storm Watches for the mountains and Denver metro area. Look for these to change to Warnings Saturday.

Winter Storm Watches for the mountains and Denver metro area. Look for these to change to Warnings Saturday.

DENVER — Wintry changes are in the forecast this weekend starting on Saturday afternoon when potent storm will bring not only rain and cooler temperatures but late season snow to the mountains and the Denver metro area.

Saturday will start out dry then quickly turn cloudy with afternoon thunderstorms along the Front Range.

As temperatures cool into the night, snow will become heavy in the mountains with rain mixing with snow in the Metro overnight and into Mother’s Day.

Winter Storm Watches are in place for the urban corridor including Fort Collins, Greeley, Boulder, Denver and Castle Rock.

Snow totals will vary between 2 to 4 inches in Denver, up to 6 inches south of Denver. Over a foot of snow is forecast in the foothills and mountains.

The snow will be wet and heavy raising the concern for build up on blossoming tree limbs. The weight of the snow also raises the risk of breaking tree limbs which can cause power outages on downed power lines.

LINK: Follow the storm with interactive radar

Travel on Sunday will be difficult as visibility will be poor and roads will be a slushy mess.

The mountains may see road closures and delays.

Some snow may linger into your Monday morning commute before the sun returns later in the day.

LINK: Watches & Warnings

Temperatures will remain cool for the first part of our week.

According to the National Weather Service, the top 15 snowstorms in Denver in May are:

15.5 inches: May 1-5, 1898

12.4 inches: May 5-6, 1978

12.4 inches: May 13-14, 1912

12 inches: May 5-6, 1917

10.7 inches: May 25-26, 1950

10 inches: May 4-5, 1908

8.9 inches: May 6-7, 1893

8.8 inches: May 15-16, 1957

8.3 inches: May 2, 1944

7.1 inches: May 17, 1983

6.4 inches: May 13, 1961

6.2 inches: May 2-5, 2001

5.6 inches: May 29, 1975

4.7 inches: May 10-11, 1918

4.7 inches: May 18-19, 1915